Disappear Here…   
 Looking at Hedi Slimane’s diary, one of the images struck me as highly familiar. And a microsecond later, I knew what it was: The cover of the paperback edition I have of Bret Easton Ellis’ Less Than Zero, the classic 80’s book on teenage malaise, ennui and drug abuse in L.A. If you’re looking for juicy summer/beach reads, you need look no further. Ellis’ books are all about the dirty, slimy growth under the glossy surface of the glam, privileged life of the rich, entitled and aimless. What always surprised me was the incisiveness of the social criticism in his books, you can never truly tell if its demonizing or adulating the subjects and their unethical/amoral/self-destructive behavior. Ellis has always proven as an author that he understands how we as a society are obsessed with the rich and famous, but that we also love to see them brought down by the excesses for which we envy them (schadenfreude in the hiz-zouse.) A guilty pleasure, if there ever was one.

Jonny in L.A. by Hedi Slimane

Disappear Here…

Looking at Hedi Slimane’s diary, one of the images struck me as highly familiar. And a microsecond later, I knew what it was: The cover of the paperback edition I have of Bret Easton Ellis’ Less Than Zero, the classic 80’s book on teenage malaise, ennui and drug abuse in L.A. If you’re looking for juicy summer/beach reads, you need look no further. Ellis’ books are all about the dirty, slimy growth under the glossy surface of the glam, privileged life of the rich, entitled and aimless. What always surprised me was the incisiveness of the social criticism in his books, you can never truly tell if its demonizing or adulating the subjects and their unethical/amoral/self-destructive behavior. Ellis has always proven as an author that he understands how we as a society are obsessed with the rich and famous, but that we also love to see them brought down by the excesses for which we envy them (schadenfreude in the hiz-zouse.) A guilty pleasure, if there ever was one.